The Soil for the Seeds: Investigating the Microenvironment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

As a predoctoral student in the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program at The Ohio State University in 2005, Bethany Mundy-Bosse, PhD, had plans to focus her graduate work on basic stem cell biology to enhance and expand her previous research experience in this field. “When I first started working in a research lab, I was working with stem cells,” recalls Mundy-Bosse, “with every intention of continuing on with basic stem cell biology.” However, after attending a course in immunology with renowned physician-scientist Michael Caligiuri, MD, she found herself completely fascinated by this field. It was this course that would ultimately motivate her to shift her career focus toward tumor immunology.

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AACR Award Recipient Tells Her Story in NY Times

For many aspiring investigators, pursuing a career in cancer research can be a complex exploration of self and purpose.

In this touching and inspiring piece published in The New York Times, a former AACR Undergraduate Scholar Awardee, Mya Roberson, now a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, shares how her participation in the AACR Annual Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved helped her realize the meaning in her research.

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Early-career Researchers Share Their Passions on Capitol Hill

US Capitol Building

Each year, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is proud to bring Associate Members to Washington, D.C., where they meet with legislators and policymakers to discuss issues that are critical to supporting medical research.

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A Young Chemical Biologist Forges a Career Path in Cancer Research

When we think about “cancer scientists,” we typically conjure images of physicians treating their patients or biologists analyzing cells under a microscope. But cancer scientists can be found in fields beyond medicine and biology, from physics to chemistry to mathematics.

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NextGen Grant Recipient Harnesses the Power of Genomics to Understand Pediatric Brain Cancer

Paul Northcott, PhD, inaugural recipient of the AACR NextGen Grant for Transformative Cancer Research, has dedicated his research career to understanding a type of brain cancer called medulloblastoma, with the ultimate goal of improving treatment and prognosis for patients.

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A Young Researcher Advocates for Strong Federal Funding

Scientific advancements are made through scientific research. From understanding the basic biology behind a disease to testing how well a drug targets a disease, the majority of this research is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). So, on September 14, 2017, hundreds of people from 37 states and Washington, D.C., from over 300 institutes and organizations, gathered for the 5th Annual Rally for Medical Research with a common message

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Cultivating a More Diverse Scientific Work Force

The U.S. Latino population surged 243 percent from 1980 to 2010. But in the same time span, the Latino physician work force dropped from 135 to 105 physicians per 100,000, according to a study by the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at the University of California, Los Angeles.

This decline is alarming. It means that the growing Latino population does not get culturally competent care needed to improve patient health outcomes.

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Taking a Local Approach to Cancer Research

When considering the most common types of cancer, gastric cancer (cancer of the stomach) is rarely discussed. It occurs at a higher frequency in specific populations, such as Alaska Native people, in whom gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death.

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