Educating the Public on Cancer Prevention

On Saturday, May 4, Philadelphians flooded the Benjamin Franklin Parkway for the Franklin Institute’s ninth annual Philadelphia Science Festival. For the fourth consecutive year, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) was a sponsor of the community event, giving eager kids and their families the opportunity to learn about science with hands-on experiments and activities.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2019: Preclinical Steps Toward a Cancer Preventive Vaccine for Lynch Syndrome

Cancer prevention refers to measures that people can take to reduce their risk of developing cancer. These measures can include lifestyle changes, like eliminating tobacco use, maintaining a healthy weight, staying active, and limiting exposure of skin to ultraviolet light. As our scientific knowledge of cancer etiology and the biology of premaligancy has grown, so too has our ability to rationally develop targeted and immunotherapeutic interventions for cancer prevention, in particular for those who inherit genetic mutations that predispose them to developing cancer.

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Hyperglycemia and Aggressive Prostate Cancer Risk

Rates of diabetes in the United States are increasing. According to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 23 million Americans received a diagnosis of diabetes in 2015, in contrast to 1.6 million Americans in 1958. Our risk for diabetes increases as we age; over 25 percent of those ages 65 or older had diabetes in 2015, according to the CDC.

Diabetes is a risk factor for several types of cancer, including liver, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. While this association is complex, some possible biological links include insulin resistance and hyperglycemia.

Previous work to understand the relationship between hyperglycemia and prostate cancer risk and mortality have yielded mixed results. A recent study published in Cancer Prevention Research evaluated whether hyperglycemia, as measured through multiple biomarkers, is associated with prostate cancer incidence and mortality.

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Gauging Progress Against Cervical Cancer

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. Given that January was named after the Roman god Janus, whose two faces allowed him to look both backward into the old year and forward into the new one, it seemed a good time to look back at the progress we made against cervical cancer in 2018 and to look for ways to build on the progress and further reduce the incidence and mortality of the disease in the future.

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An Important Skin Cancer Prevention Reminder: Don’t Fry

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. Every year, about 5 million Americans are treated for various forms of the disease.

Skin cancer types include basal and squamous cell cancers, as well as melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. About 73,870 Americans are expected to be diagnosed with melanoma this year. Survival rates are significantly higher when the disease is diagnosed at its earliest stage.

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AICR Guest Post: Healthy Habits to Lower Cancer Risk

Editor’s note: February is Cancer Prevention Month. That’s why the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) has been pleased to support the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) Cancer Prevention: Together We Can campaign, an initiative dedicated to promoting evidence-based information to reduce cancer risk. This blog post was developed and shared by the AICR.

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Why We Need Tailored Tobacco-control Strategies

Cigarette smoking is linked to 18 different types of cancer. It is the leading preventable cause of cancer in the United States, accounting for 19 percent of the 1,570,978 cancers diagnosed in U.S. adults ages 30 and older in 2014, according to the latest research. Another 0.4 percent of the cancer diagnoses in the U.S. that year were attributable to exposure to secondhand smoke.

That’s why February, which is National Cancer Prevention Month, is a good time to raise awareness of the dangers of cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke.

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Heading Into Summer, Please “Don’t Fry”

Today is National “Don’t Fry Day,” an initiative undertaken by the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention to encourage sun safety awareness and to remind people to limit their exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which has been proven to cause skin cancer.

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New Guidelines Suggest Individualized Approach to Prostate Cancer Screening

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released draft recommendations April 11 suggesting that doctors inform men ages 55 to 69 of the potential benefits and harms of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood testing to screen for prostate cancer. The draft says the decision to be screened is an individual one that should be made after consulting with a physician.

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