Prostate Cancer Disparities: Race-related Biological Differences

Non-Hispanic black men in the United States are much more likely to develop prostate cancer and to die from the disease than their non-Hispanic white counterparts. Many factors contribute to this striking disparity, including access to and use of health care, social and economic status, and biology. As discussed by Steven R. Patierno, PhD, and colleagues in a recent perspective article in the AACR journal Clinical Cancer Research, alternative RNA splicing is one biological factor contributing to prostate cancer disparities.

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Increasing Awareness of Breast Cancer Health Disparities

This month is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, a type of cancer against which we have made much progress. However, a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) highlights that the progress we are making has not been uniform for all segments of the population.

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The Cost of Cancer Disparities

The AACR’s disparities conference covered a wide array of issues this year, from the biological factors that make some racial and ethnic groups especially prone to certain types of cancer, to intriguing new ways to improve prevention and detection, to the cost of cancer disparities.

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A Holistic Approach to Cancer Health Disparities

Guest post by L. Michelle Bennett, director of the NCI Center for Research Strategies; Worta McCaskill-Stevens, MD, chief of the NCI Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group; and Sanya Springfield, PhD, director of the NCI Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities.

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From the Journals: Progress Against Colorectal Cancer Lags in Three Large U.S. “Hot Spots”

While most of the United States has experienced large declines in colorectal cancer death rates in recent years, progress in three large “hot spots” has lagged, according to a study …

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