AACR Annual Meeting 2019: Past, Present, and Future of CDK4/6-targeted Therapeutics

Therapeutics that target two proteins called cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK6 have revolutionized treatment for breast cancer, Richard S. Finn, MD, told attendees of the Making Science Count for Patients: CDK4/6 special session during the recent AACR Annual Meeting 2019. This session was designed to review the progress made with this class of anticancer therapeutics, starting from basic science through preclinical and clinical development, and to look to what we might expect from these agents in the future.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2019: Plenary Examines Global Issues in Cancer

The AACR Annual Meeting 2019 features the theme “Integrative Cancer Science • Global Impact • Individualized Patient Care.” That theme provided the structure for Monday’s plenary session, when cancer researchers representing three continents, four cancer types, and diverse areas of interest took the stage.

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Research Highlights from the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2018

The 41st San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 4-8, drew more than 7,500 attendees from more than 90 countries. The Symposium offered the latest clinical, translational, and basic research, providing a forum for interaction and communication among researchers, health professionals, and those with a special interest in breast cancer.

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FDA Approves a New PARP Inhibitor for BRCA-mutant Breast Cancer

In the midst of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the US. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provided good news for the breast cancer community this week when it approved a new breast cancer therapeutic called talazoparib (Talzenna), which targets ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) proteins. They also approved a test to identify those patients eligible to receive talazoparib: patients with metastatic or locally advanced, HER2-negative breast cancer who have an inherited, cancer-associated BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation.

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Understanding Inherited Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. In 2018, 266,120 women and 2,550 men are expected to receive the news that they have the disease, according to National Cancer Institute data.

Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes account for between 5 percent and 10 percent of breast cancers in U.S. women and between 5 percent and 20 percent of breast cancers in U.S. men. For women who undergo genetic testing and learn that they have inherited a BRCA1/2 mutation before they receive a breast cancer diagnosis there are ways to reduce their risk of going on to develop the disease.

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Can Artificial Intelligence Help Reduce False-positive Mammograms?

In a study published in the AACR’s journal Clinical Cancer Research, a team of scientists from the University of Pittsburgh discuss yet another area of cancer research where artificial intelligence (AI) can potentially solve a decades-long problem: false-positive results and high patient recall rates from breast cancer screening mammography.

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FDA Approves First Targeted Therapeutic for BRCA-mutant Breast Cancer

On Friday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the molecularly targeted therapeutic olaparib (Lynparza) for treating certain patients with metastatic, HER2-negative breast cancer. The FDA also granted marketing authorization for a test to identify those patients eligible to receive olaparib: patients with an inherited, cancer-associated BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation.

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SABCS Marks 40 Years

Kent Osborne, MD, a codirector of SABCS, wrote a guest post for Cancer Research Catalyst in 2015 that details the symposium’s growth. We’re happy to present it again. Check back with Cancer Research Catalyst frequently for updates from SABCS, which will take place Dec. 5-9.

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Treating DNA Repair-deficient Breast Cancers

Several clinical trials are underway in which PARP inhibitors are being tested in breast cancers, mostly triple-negative breast cancers, because they often harbor BRCA mutations and DNA repair deficiencies. Emerging studies show that the benefit of PARP inhibitors could extend beyond breast cancers with germline BRCA mutations.

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FDA Approves New Treatment Option for Breast Cancer

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provided some good news for the breast cancer community just days before the start of breast cancer awareness month when it added a new molecularly targeted therapeutic to the armamentarium for oncologists treating patients with breast cancer: abemaciclib (Verzenio).

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