AACR’s Global Scholars in Training Reflect on Annual Meeting Experience

This spring, in the inaugural year of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Global-Scholar-In-Training Awards (GSITA) program, 15 young researchers from around the world arrived in Atlanta eager to share their knowledge and to draw upon the global brain trust of cancer scientists attending AACR’s 110th Annual Meeting. Recipients also participated in a networking and mentoring event hosted by Emory University’s Winship Cancer Institute which included a tour of laboratory and clinical facilities, presentations by doctoral students, and research and career advice from Emory faculty and staff.

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AACR and Bayer Grants Support Innovative Research

The AACR-Bayer Innovation and Discovery Grants program supports researchers who are seeking to develop new treatment options for cancers with high unmet medical need. The program aims to encourage innovation and translation of ideas from basic research into novel drugs, and to foster collaborations between academic groups and the pharmaceutical industry.

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Enabling Promising Postdocs to Become the Global Research Leaders of Tomorrow

Funded in partnership with the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), our new Transatlantic Fellowships provide high-potential early-career researchers with a unique opportunity to accelerate their careers. The Fellowships offer £300,000/$400,000 over four years to support the development of recently graduated PhDs and early-career postdocs into independent researchers at top institutions in the United Kingdom and the United States.

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AACR to Continue Unique Grant Program to Support Physician-Scientists in Training

In addition to world-class training in patient care, physician-scientists also require experience in laboratory and clinic-based research to ensure that they stay up-to-date with the pace of medical progress. As such, many fellowship programs offer dedicated research time, often for a year or longer, to these young physician-scientists, providing them with sufficient expertise to contribute to laboratory-based research projects or clinical trials that will advance medical practice and improve patient outcomes.

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Inspired By Her Mother, AACR Grantee Embarks on a Career in Cancer Research

Wen-Yang Lin, PhD, MS, currently a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University and the recipient of the 2017 AACR-Genentech Fellowship in Lung Cancer Research, is a relative newcomer to the field of cancer research. Previously, she had studied biomedical engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles and neuroscience at the University of Washington, where her PhD thesis concerned growth control in Drosophila sensory neurons. During this time, Lin’s mother was diagnosed with stage II ovarian cancer. “My mother had been through several rounds of surgeries, tried different combinations of chemotherapies and radiation therapies,” Lin recalls, “but she still passed away only five years after the diagnosis.”

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Examining the Tumor Microenvironment and Metabolism in Ovarian Cancer

Dong-Joo (Ellen) Cheon, PhD, Assistant Professor of Regenerative and Cancer Cell Biology at Albany Medical College and the 2017 AACR Gertrude B. Elion Cancer Research Award grantee, has been working in the field of ovarian cancer her entire career.

She was first introduced to ovarian cancer research as a graduate student at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston when she was tasked with generating CA125 knockout mice. CA125, or cancer antigen 125, is a blood serum biomarker routinely used to diagnose and monitor ovarian cancer.

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AACR Announces the Global Scholar-in-Training Awards

Building upon the success of the African Cancer Researchers Travel Awards, the American Association for Cancer Research is pleased to announce the expansion of this award program and to invite eligible applicants from all low-, lower-middle, and middle-income economy countries (LMIC).

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The Soil for the Seeds: Investigating the Microenvironment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

As a predoctoral student in the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program at The Ohio State University in 2005, Bethany Mundy-Bosse, PhD, had plans to focus her graduate work on basic stem cell biology to enhance and expand her previous research experience in this field. “When I first started working in a research lab, I was working with stem cells,” recalls Mundy-Bosse, “with every intention of continuing on with basic stem cell biology.” However, after attending a course in immunology with renowned physician-scientist Michael Caligiuri, MD, she found herself completely fascinated by this field. It was this course that would ultimately motivate her to shift her career focus toward tumor immunology.

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