From the Journals: Editors’ Picks for September

As we welcome the fall season, it’s time for our September edition of Editors’ Picks, a monthly collection of articles hand-picked by the editors of the eight scientific journals published by the AACR. This month, articles span from an assessment of a first-in-class antibody-drug conjugate targeting the antigen CD205 in xenograft models, to results from a clinical trial evaluating the dual inhibition of VEGFR2 and MET in patients with advanced solid tumors. Read on to learn about this month’s selections, which are freely available for a limited time.

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Learning Lessons From Diverse Populations

The 12th AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved wrapped up Monday in San Francisco. This year marked record attendance for the conference, as well as a record number of abstracts that helped shape a dynamic, diverse program.

The meeting reinforced the central dilemma of cancer health disparities: While advances in cancer research have improved outcomes for many Americans, underserved and underrepresented groups have not benefited equally.

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“It Doesn’t Have to be This Way”: Targeting Cancer Health Disparities

The 12th AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved kicked off Friday evening in San Francisco with a passionate call to fight cancer disparities on every front, from socioeconomic to biological.

“Everyone in this room is united in our goal to eliminate cancer health disparities,” said conference cochair Phyllis Pettit Nassi, MSW, manager of Special Populations and Native American Outreach at Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City. “Medical research powers our ability to treat our patients. Conferences such as this, where we unite as a community, fuel hope that we can improve the lives of our patients.”

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Orchestrating an Antitumor Immune Response: A Preview of the Fifth International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference

Immunotherapy is a form of cancer treatment that helps a patient’s own immune system recognize and attack cancer cells. Research on different types of immunotherapy has exploded over the past decade, and such approaches have proven to be successful for many patients. However, challenges remain, including a lack of response in some patients, development of resistance, and difficulties using certain immunotherapies in solid tumors.

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AACR Cancer Progress Report 2019: Harnessing Research Discoveries for Patient Benefit

Today, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) released its ninth annual Cancer Progress Report. The report highlights how research largely supported by federal investments in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is spurring improvements in public health and innovative breakthroughs across the spectrum of cancer care.

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The Right Dose: Researching Cancer Treatment De-Escalation

Cancer researchers often focus on developing novel treatments or combining therapies in new ways, all with the goal of lengthening survival for patients. But some cancer research has a different goal: to reduce the amount and intensity of treatment patients receive while maintaining equally good cancer outcomes. In the summer 2019 issue of Cancer Today, digital editor Kate Yandell writes about the challenges and successes of this approach, called treatment de-escalation.

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Toward Achieving Health Equity – A Preview of the 12th AACR Cancer Health Disparities Conference

In recent decades, the cancer research community has made great strides by bringing new, targeted, safer, and longer-lasting treatments to patients dealing with a variety of cancers. While this achievement is truly remarkable and laudable, a glaring fact is that these groundbreaking advances have not translated into progress for everyone.

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Upcoming AACR Meeting Focuses on Recent Advances in Pancreatic Cancer Research

Pancreatic cancer is projected to become the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States by 2030. The prognosis for this disease remains grim: The overall five-year survival rate is lower than 10 percent, and this rate drops to less than 3 percent if the disease is identified after the cancer has metastasized, a stage at which more than half of pancreatic cancers are diagnosed.

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