AACR Award Recipient Tells Her Story in NY Times

For many aspiring investigators, pursuing a career in cancer research can be a complex exploration of self and purpose.

In this touching and inspiring piece published in The New York Times, a former AACR Undergraduate Scholar Awardee, Mya Roberson, now a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, shares how her participation in the AACR Annual Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved helped her realize the meaning in her research.

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STAR Act Aims to Boost Pediatric Research

This week, President Trump signed the Childhood Cancer Survivorship, Treatment, Access and Research (STAR) Act, which is aimed at supporting pediatric cancer research. The legislation calls for expanding the collection of patient biospecimens and records, improving surveillance, and investigating pediatric survivorship.

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Disparities in End-of-Life Care

For cancer patients at the ends of their lives, hospice care can provide access to comfort measures and extra help. Medicare offers hospice benefits to eligible patients. But not all patients have equal access to this care, research indicates.

In the spring issue of Cancer Today, medical and business journalist Charlotte Huff writes about disparities in end-of-life care affecting U.S. cancer patients.

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Utilizing Patient-reported Outcomes in Cancer Clinical Trials

Assessing new anticancer therapeutics in clinical trials is a vital step in evaluating the toxicity and efficacy of treatment before its approval for widespread use. Throughout these trials, many patients encounter a variety of side effects, ranging from physical ailments such as nausea or rash to psychological symptoms such as depression or anxiety. While it is standard practice to record clinician-reported outcomes to characterize safety, there is no current standard requirement for the use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in cancer clinical trials.

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An Important Skin Cancer Prevention Reminder: Don’t Fry

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. Every year, about 5 million Americans are treated for various forms of the disease.

Skin cancer types include basal and squamous cell cancers, as well as melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. About 73,870 Americans are expected to be diagnosed with melanoma this year. Survival rates are significantly higher when the disease is diagnosed at its earliest stage.

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Why Is Liver Cancer on the Rise?

Although liver cancer isn’t as prevalent as lung cancer or breast cancer, this cancer is now the fastest-increasing cause of cancer death in the United States. In the Spring 2018 issue of Cancer Today, contributing editor Sue Rochman explored contributing factors for the increased liver cancer incidence since the mid-1970s.

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FDA Approves Targeted Therapy Combo for Thyroid Cancer

On May 4, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a combination of molecularly targeted therapeutics for the treatment of a certain type of thyroid cancer. Specifically, the FDA approved the use of dabrafenib (Tafinlar) in combination with trametinib (Mekinist) for treating patients who have anaplastic thyroid cancer that cannot be removed by surgery or that has metastasized, and that tests positive for a BRAF V600E gene mutation.

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