AACR’s Latest Journal, Blood Cancer Discovery, Publishes First Paper

The first paper to be accepted by the AACR’s latest journal, Blood Cancer Discovery, was published online last week. The paper, which is freely available on the journal website, describes the landscape of mutations present in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and how this landscape changes during treatment, leading to relapse.

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FDA Rounded out 2019 by Approving a New Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer

In the final days of 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved expanding the use of a previously approved molecularly targeted therapeutic called olaparib (Lynparza) to include treating certain patients diagnosed with one of the deadliest types of cancer—pancreatic cancer.

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FDA Approves New Treatments for Three Cancer Types 

In the past few weeks, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced three approvals for new treatments for several types of cancer. On December 18, the FDA approved the new molecularly targeted therapeutic enfortumab vedotin-ejfv (Padcev) to treat certain patients who have bladder cancer; on November 21, the agency expanded the use of the molecularly targeted therapeutic acalabrutinib (Calquence) to include treating adults who have chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL); and on November 14, it approved the new molecularly targeted therapeutic zanubrutinib (Brukinsa) to treat certain patients who have mantle cell lymphoma.  

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2019 in Review: Progress Across Many Areas of Cancer Research

In 2019, research continued to drive progress across the spectrum of cancer care in the form of new and better ways to prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat some of the many diseases we call cancer. Here’s a look at some key developments in drug approvals, immunotherapy, precision medicine, and disparities research.

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Project GENIE Contributes Data on More Than 40,000 New Cancer Cases

The National Cancer Institute’s Genomic Data Commons (GDC) has released data for 44,756 cancer cases from the American Association for Cancer Research’s Project Genomics Evidence Neoplasia Information Exchange, more simply known as AACR Project GENIE. This massive project was launched in 2015 with the goal of building an international, pan-cancer registry with tens of thousands of patients to empower precision oncology.

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SABCS to Showcase Advances in Breast Cancer Treatments

Editor’s note: When the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) kicks off next week, researchers will present the results of dozens of clinical trials. Among several eagerly anticipated studies is a phase II trial of the TKI inhibitor tucatinib, given in combination with trastuzumab (Herceptin) and capecitabine.

A version of this article on the tucatinib trial is freely available on the Cancer Discovery website, where you can find further coverage of SABCS throughout the meeting.

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From the Journals: Editors’ Picks for November

Each month, the editors from the portfolio of scientific journals published by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) highlight one “must read” article from every journal issue, which we summarize here. This month’s edition is stuffed with studies relating to recent clinical trials, a preclinical investigation of NSAIDs for the inhibition of colon tumor progression, and many more. As always, articles featured here are freely available for a limited time.

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FDA’s Office of Hematology and Oncology Products Reorganizes

Earlier this month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products (OHOP), which is responsible for reviewing cancer therapies, has been reorganized into the Office of Oncologic Diseases (OOD) as part of a broader effort within the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research to modernize its New Drugs Regulatory Program.

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Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics Conference Moves Targeting KRAS to the Fore

After three decades of failed efforts to target the elusive KRAS and its family members NRAS and HRAS, proto-oncogenes altered in about a third of cancers, encouraging data emerging from clinical trials and preclinical studies suggest KRAS could finally be dethroned from the “undruggable” category.

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