Carl June, MD, Talks CAR T-cell Therapies at AACR Conference

One of the most watched areas in the immuno-oncology field is the development of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Carl June, MD, professor in immunotherapy at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, is a pioneer in the CAR T field; he helped to treat the first child with CAR T-cell therapy, which was experimental at the time. Emily Whitehead, who was treated with CAR T cells in 2012 for acute lymphoblastic leukemia after she relapsed twice following treatment with chemotherapy, remains in complete remission today.

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Conference Set to Present the Latest Research and Developments on Cancer Health Disparities

When Michael Lawing was diagnosed with stage 3 renal cell carcinoma in 1997, he knew almost nothing about the disease.

Neither did his local urologist in rural North Carolina.

Within three years, Lawing’s cancer metastasized. His local doctor referred him to a specialist in Charlotte. Under his care, Lawing began a clinical trial of an immunotherapeutic drug. His cancer stabilized. Over the past two decades, he has experienced several recurrences of cancer, but a steady stream of newly approved treatments, most recently the immunotherapeutic Opdivo (nivolumab), have kept his disease under control. He is currently monitored with quarterly CT scans, but is taking no additional medication and experiences no symptoms or side effects.

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Party with a Purpose Joins AACR to Support Prostate Cancer Research

For the third year running, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) has been selected as the beneficiary of the 18th annual Party with a Purpose, a cause-driven gala in Philadelphia that supports lifesaving cancer research. Funds raised at this year’s event will be dedicated to research focused on prostate cancer. This common cancer is estimated to affect nearly 165,000 men in 2018, according to recent statistics.

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AACR Announces the Global Scholar-in-Training Awards

Building upon the success of the African Cancer Researchers Travel Awards, the American Association for Cancer Research is pleased to announce the expansion of this award program and to invite eligible applicants from all low-, lower-middle, and middle-income economy countries (LMIC).

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AACR Travel Awards Bring African Researchers to Annual Meeting

This past April, the American Association for Cancer Research welcomed its 2018 class of African Cancer Researchers Travel Award (ACRTA) recipients to its Annual Meeting. Established in 2016, these travel awards provide financial assistance to meritorious early-career investigators engaged in cancer research in Africa, allowing them to attend and present their research at the AACR Annual Meeting.

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From the Journals: Editors’ Picks for July

Each month, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) publishes 10 articles from its eight esteemed scientific journals, showcasing some of the leading discoveries in cancer research. Read on to learn about the editors’ selections from this month. All articles featured are freely available for a limited time.

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AACR Award Recipient Tells Her Story in NY Times

For many aspiring investigators, pursuing a career in cancer research can be a complex exploration of self and purpose.

In this touching and inspiring piece published in The New York Times, a former AACR Undergraduate Scholar Awardee, Mya Roberson, now a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, shares how her participation in the AACR Annual Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved helped her realize the meaning in her research.

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Recent Advances in Measuring Response to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

In recent years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved immune checkpoint inhibitors, a class of immunotherapy, to treat 10 different types of cancer, in addition to solid tumors located anywhere in the body that have certain DNA damage and repair-related biomarkers. However, only a small percentage of patients respond to these treatments, and they can have significant side effects. Researchers are looking for biomarkers that can identify patients who are likely to respond to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

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