AACR’s Global Scholars in Training Reflect on Annual Meeting Experience

This spring, in the inaugural year of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Global-Scholar-In-Training Awards (GSITA) program, 15 young researchers from around the world arrived in Atlanta eager to share their knowledge and to draw upon the global brain trust of cancer scientists attending AACR’s 110th Annual Meeting. Recipients also participated in a networking and mentoring event hosted by Emory University’s Winship Cancer Institute which included a tour of laboratory and clinical facilities, presentations by doctoral students, and research and career advice from Emory faculty and staff.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2019: Patients as Partners in the Research Process

In the past couple of decades, progress against cancer has created a new generation of survivors. Today, more than 16.9 million people in the United States are cancer survivors. While their experiences are incredibly diverse, many are living well. They work, they tend to their families, they travel … and many are inspired to play a role in the cancer research community.

The Presidential Select Symposium at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019 addressed these crucial roles in a session titled “Engaging Cancer Patients as Partners in the Research Process.” The session was moderated by outgoing AACR President Elizabeth M. Jaffee, MD, Deputy Director of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins.

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Enabling Promising Postdocs to Become the Global Research Leaders of Tomorrow

Funded in partnership with the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), our new Transatlantic Fellowships provide high-potential early-career researchers with a unique opportunity to accelerate their careers. The Fellowships offer £300,000/$400,000 over four years to support the development of recently graduated PhDs and early-career postdocs into independent researchers at top institutions in the United Kingdom and the United States.

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Translating Science Into Survival: An AACR Early-career Scientist Returns to the Hill

One late summer morning, I recall seeing a petite woman carrying two suitcases near the entrance to a hospital. She was alone and seemed indifferent to the commotion enveloping her.

This instance was mere moments long, yet it is ingrained in my memory. Because nearly six years ago, when I entered our cancer hospital on my first day as a doctoral student in cancer biology, this was exactly what I saw. I saw a woman, carrying her most precious belongings as she checked into the hospital for cancer treatment.

As I offered to help with her luggage, she kindly obliged and asked to share with me her story. Why? She wanted “at least one person to remember” her. And she got her wish, before succumbing to her disease two weeks later.

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Supporting the Vital Role of Women in Science

February 11 marks the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, a United Nations initiative to encourage full and equal access to and participation in science for women and girls. Women have been responsible for countless scientific breakthroughs, yet they are underrepresented in the highest ranks of the scientific community. In many countries, women and girls do not have adequate access to scientific education, making it difficult to even contemplate careers in science.

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Experts Forecast Cancer Research and Treatment Advances in 2019

In 2018, we witnessed significant momentum in several hot areas of cancer research, including immunotherapy and precision medicine. Researchers have amassed exponential amounts of knowledge in these areas of scientific inquiry in recent years, and 2018 saw many of these gains culminate into innovative treatments for cancer patients.

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Carl June, MD, Talks CAR T-cell Therapies at AACR Conference

One of the most watched areas in the immuno-oncology field is the development of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Carl June, MD, professor in immunotherapy at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, is a pioneer in the CAR T field; he helped to treat the first child with CAR T-cell therapy, which was experimental at the time. Emily Whitehead, who was treated with CAR T cells in 2012 for acute lymphoblastic leukemia after she relapsed twice following treatment with chemotherapy, remains in complete remission today.

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Conference Set to Present the Latest Research and Developments on Cancer Health Disparities

When Michael Lawing was diagnosed with stage 3 renal cell carcinoma in 1997, he knew almost nothing about the disease.

Neither did his local urologist in rural North Carolina.

Within three years, Lawing’s cancer metastasized. His local doctor referred him to a specialist in Charlotte. Under his care, Lawing began a clinical trial of an immunotherapeutic drug. His cancer stabilized. Over the past two decades, he has experienced several recurrences of cancer, but a steady stream of newly approved treatments, most recently the immunotherapeutic Opdivo (nivolumab), have kept his disease under control. He is currently monitored with quarterly CT scans, but is taking no additional medication and experiences no symptoms or side effects.

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Party with a Purpose Joins AACR to Support Prostate Cancer Research

For the third year running, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) has been selected as the beneficiary of the 18th annual Party with a Purpose, a cause-driven gala in Philadelphia that supports lifesaving cancer research. Funds raised at this year’s event will be dedicated to research focused on prostate cancer. This common cancer is estimated to affect nearly 165,000 men in 2018, according to recent statistics.

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AACR Announces the Global Scholar-in-Training Awards

Building upon the success of the African Cancer Researchers Travel Awards, the American Association for Cancer Research is pleased to announce the expansion of this award program and to invite eligible applicants from all low-, lower-middle, and middle-income economy countries (LMIC).

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