AACR Journals to Share Editors’ Picks

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) publishes eight esteemed scientific journals. Each month, these journals feature a wide range of peer-reviewed research that encompasses the entire spectrum of cancer science. Some of the world’s leading cancer scientists publish articles in our journals, contributing greatly toward the AACR’s mission to prevent and cure cancer through research, education, communication, and collaboration.

We are pleased to debut a new feature on the blog, Editors’ Picks. Each month, AACR journal editors will share a curated list of original articles, representing each publication. While our journals are subscription-based, the stories featured in Editors’ Picks will be freely available for the month.

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STAR Act Aims to Boost Pediatric Research

This week, President Trump signed the Childhood Cancer Survivorship, Treatment, Access and Research (STAR) Act, which is aimed at supporting pediatric cancer research. The legislation calls for expanding the collection of patient biospecimens and records, improving surveillance, and investigating pediatric survivorship.

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Utilizing Patient-reported Outcomes in Cancer Clinical Trials

Assessing new anticancer therapeutics in clinical trials is a vital step in evaluating the toxicity and efficacy of treatment before its approval for widespread use. Throughout these trials, many patients encounter a variety of side effects, ranging from physical ailments such as nausea or rash to psychological symptoms such as depression or anxiety. While it is standard practice to record clinician-reported outcomes to characterize safety, there is no current standard requirement for the use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in cancer clinical trials.

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An Important Skin Cancer Prevention Reminder: Don’t Fry

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. Every year, about 5 million Americans are treated for various forms of the disease.

Skin cancer types include basal and squamous cell cancers, as well as melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. About 73,870 Americans are expected to be diagnosed with melanoma this year. Survival rates are significantly higher when the disease is diagnosed at its earliest stage.

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Why We Need Tailored Tobacco-control Strategies

Cigarette smoking is linked to 18 different types of cancer. It is the leading preventable cause of cancer in the United States, accounting for 19 percent of the 1,570,978 cancers diagnosed in U.S. adults ages 30 and older in 2014, according to the latest research. Another 0.4 percent of the cancer diagnoses in the U.S. that year were attributable to exposure to secondhand smoke.

That’s why February, which is National Cancer Prevention Month, is a good time to raise awareness of the dangers of cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke.

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Could Genomics Influence Prostate Cancer Treatment?

Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed in the United States. About one-third of men diagnosed with prostate cancer have a tumor that grows very slowly, making it very unlikely that the disease will progress to become a clinical problem. Characterizing new ways to identify these cancers is an area of active research investigation.

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