ESPN Reporter Holly Rowe Works Through Cancer

Sports are often referred to as a metaphor for life. But, for ESPN reporter Holly Rowe, sports are quite literally a way of life. When Rowe was undergoing treatment for desmoplastic melanoma, her passion for sports—and telling athletes’ stories from the sidelines—helped her muscle through her own personal struggles.

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Bringing Awareness to Breast Cancer in October

Breast cancer can be a scary diagnosis. Even though mortality rates have declined in recent years in the United States, it is estimated that over 40,000 women and roughly 500 men will die from breast cancer in 2019. Despite progress in developing new treatment modalities for patients with this disease, there is still substantial work to be done in the field.

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Talking Tamales: A Culturally Tailored Health Education Strategy

The women bustle around a warm, colorful kitchen, making tamales for an upcoming family party. A woman in her 20s has received the distressing news that she has tested positive for the human papillomavirus (HPV). She’s upset and angry, but also resolved to do everything she can to prevent the virus from developing into cervical cancer.

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Use of Pembrolizumab Expanded to 13th Type of Cancer in Five Years

The use of immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer has dramatically increased in the five years since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first approved the groundbreaking immunotherapeutic pembrolizumab (Keytruda). Since that September 2014 approval, for melanoma, pembrolizumab has been approved for use in the treatment of another 12 types of cancer, most recently endometrial cancer, and the treatment of any type of solid tumor that tests positive for either of two specific biomarkers, microsatellite instability–high or mismatch repair–deficient.

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AACR Meeting Highlights Recent Advances in Pediatric Cancer Research

Pediatric cancer, while rare, is a devastating diagnosis that is estimated to affect over 11,000 children in the United States in 2019. Among those diagnosed between birth and age 14, more than 1,000 are anticipated to die from the disease this year. The most common types of cancer in this age group are leukemias, brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors, and lymphomas.

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Learning Lessons From Diverse Populations

The 12th AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved wrapped up Monday in San Francisco. This year marked record attendance for the conference, as well as a record number of abstracts that helped shape a dynamic, diverse program.

The meeting reinforced the central dilemma of cancer health disparities: While advances in cancer research have improved outcomes for many Americans, underserved and underrepresented groups have not benefited equally.

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“It Doesn’t Have to be This Way”: Targeting Cancer Health Disparities

The 12th AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved kicked off Friday evening in San Francisco with a passionate call to fight cancer disparities on every front, from socioeconomic to biological.

“Everyone in this room is united in our goal to eliminate cancer health disparities,” said conference cochair Phyllis Pettit Nassi, MSW, manager of Special Populations and Native American Outreach at Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City. “Medical research powers our ability to treat our patients. Conferences such as this, where we unite as a community, fuel hope that we can improve the lives of our patients.”

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The Right Dose: Researching Cancer Treatment De-Escalation

Cancer researchers often focus on developing novel treatments or combining therapies in new ways, all with the goal of lengthening survival for patients. But some cancer research has a different goal: to reduce the amount and intensity of treatment patients receive while maintaining equally good cancer outcomes. In the summer 2019 issue of Cancer Today, digital editor Kate Yandell writes about the challenges and successes of this approach, called treatment de-escalation.

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