Cancer Today Book Discussion: “When Breath Becomes Air”

As part of ongoing efforts to increase dialogue between cancer patients, survivors, physicians, and researchers, Cancer Today hosts an online discussion about a book that provides a unique take on the cancer experience. This summer, the editors have chosen to talk about The New York Times best-selling memoir When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi.

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Liquid Biopsy: Promises and Problems

Biopsies have been an integral part of cancer care for decades. In undiagnosed patients, oncologists can examine suspicious tissues and determine if the cells are benign or malignant. Following diagnosis, biopsies can reveal additional information about a patient’s tumor – What mutations are driving this cancer? Is this patient likely to respond to a particular therapy? In cases of cancer recurrence, biopsies can provide further information – Has this patient become resistant to treatment? Is the tumor driven by different mutations?

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AACR Holds Congressional Briefing on Strengthening Prevention of E-Cigarette Use in Youth

US Capitol Building

Policymakers, parents, teachers, and public health professionals have all expressed concern about the rise in teen vaping and a strong desire to find ways to reverse the trend. On Wednesday, the American Association for Cancer Research held a congressional briefing to update policymakers and the public on the latest scientific evidence related to e-cigarettes and to start a dialogue about challenges and potential solutions in prevention of youth vaping.

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AACR Blog Turns 4: How Far Has Immunotherapy Advanced in That Time?

This week marks the fourth anniversary of Cancer Research Catalyst, the official blog of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). As outlined in the welcome post from AACR Chief Executive Officer Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), the blog was launched to increase the spread of new knowledge about cancer.

Over these four years, our blog posts have disseminated information about advances across the breadth of cancer research and the clinical cancer care continuum. One area in which advances have occurred at a particularly rapid pace is immunotherapy.

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AACR Journals to Share Editors’ Picks

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) publishes eight esteemed scientific journals. Each month, these journals feature a wide range of peer-reviewed research that encompasses the entire spectrum of cancer science. Some of the world’s leading cancer scientists publish articles in our journals, contributing greatly toward the AACR’s mission to prevent and cure cancer through research, education, communication, and collaboration.

We are pleased to debut a new feature on the blog, Editors’ Picks. Each month, AACR journal editors will share a curated list of original articles, representing each publication. While our journals are subscription-based, the stories featured in Editors’ Picks will be freely available for the month.

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FDA Expands Use of Pembrolizumab to Two Additional Cancer Types

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) increased the number of types of cancer for which pembrolizumab (Keytruda) is a treatment option when it approved the immunotherapeutic for treating certain patients with cervical cancer and certain patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

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AACR Award Recipient Tells Her Story in NY Times

For many aspiring investigators, pursuing a career in cancer research can be a complex exploration of self and purpose.

In this touching and inspiring piece published in The New York Times, a former AACR Undergraduate Scholar Awardee, Mya Roberson, now a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, shares how her participation in the AACR Annual Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved helped her realize the meaning in her research.

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Utilizing Patient-reported Outcomes in Cancer Clinical Trials

Assessing new anticancer therapeutics in clinical trials is a vital step in evaluating the toxicity and efficacy of treatment before its approval for widespread use. Throughout these trials, many patients encounter a variety of side effects, ranging from physical ailments such as nausea or rash to psychological symptoms such as depression or anxiety. While it is standard practice to record clinician-reported outcomes to characterize safety, there is no current standard requirement for the use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in cancer clinical trials.

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