Supporting the Vital Role of Women in Science

February 11 marks the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, a United Nations initiative to encourage full and equal access to and participation in science for women and girls. Women have been responsible for countless scientific breakthroughs, yet they are underrepresented in the highest ranks of the scientific community. In many countries, women and girls do not have adequate access to scientific education, making it difficult to even contemplate careers in science.

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Meet John D. Carpten, PhD, Program Chair of the AACR Annual Meeting 2019

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2019 will soon be upon us. It begins in the Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, at 3 p.m. on Friday, March 29. The Friday start, which is a day earlier than usual, is to ensure that meeting attendees have the maximal ability to participate in the expanded slate of educational sessions and methods workshops included in this year’s program. The content of these and the other AACR Annual Meeting 2019 sessions can be viewed through the Online Itinerary Planner starting later today.

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World Cancer Day 2019: Education and Inspiration Around the Globe

On February 4, 2019, organizations around the globe will come together to recognize World Cancer Day, bringing awareness to the immense burden of cancer that continues to be felt throughout the world. Joining the global community in showing support to all those affected by cancer, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) raises awareness about cancer and cancer research by educating the public about cancer, both in the United States and internationally.

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Cancer Survival: Improving Health After Treatment

At long last, cancer survival statistics are beginning to reveal real progress. From 1991 to 2015, the cancer death rate in the U.S. dropped by 26 percent, resulting in an estimated 2.4 million fewer cancer deaths. In 2016, more than 15.5 million Americans with a history of cancer were alive; that number is projected to exceed 20 million by 2026. The U.S. health care system faces a looming challenge: how to deal with the wide array of health and wellness aftereffects faced by children and adults who were once cancer patients.

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Gauging Progress Against Cervical Cancer

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. Given that January was named after the Roman god Janus, whose two faces allowed him to look both backward into the old year and forward into the new one, it seemed a good time to look back at the progress we made against cervical cancer in 2018 and to look for ways to build on the progress and further reduce the incidence and mortality of the disease in the future.

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AACR to Continue Unique Grant Program to Support Physician-Scientists in Training

In addition to world-class training in patient care, physician-scientists also require experience in laboratory and clinic-based research to ensure that they stay up-to-date with the pace of medical progress. As such, many fellowship programs offer dedicated research time, often for a year or longer, to these young physician-scientists, providing them with sufficient expertise to contribute to laboratory-based research projects or clinical trials that will advance medical practice and improve patient outcomes.

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Experts Forecast Cancer Research and Treatment Advances in 2019

In 2018, we witnessed significant momentum in several hot areas of cancer research, including immunotherapy and precision medicine. Researchers have amassed exponential amounts of knowledge in these areas of scientific inquiry in recent years, and 2018 saw many of these gains culminate into innovative treatments for cancer patients.

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Carl June, MD, Talks CAR T-cell Therapies at AACR Conference

One of the most watched areas in the immuno-oncology field is the development of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Carl June, MD, professor in immunotherapy at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, is a pioneer in the CAR T field; he helped to treat the first child with CAR T-cell therapy, which was experimental at the time. Emily Whitehead, who was treated with CAR T cells in 2012 for acute lymphoblastic leukemia after she relapsed twice following treatment with chemotherapy, remains in complete remission today.

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How Can We Turn “Cold” Pancreatic Tumors “Hot”?

Pancreatic cancer remains a challenging disease to treat, with a five-year survival rate of less than 9 percent, according to recent statistics. Unlike many other cancers, which can now be treated with checkpoint blockade immunotherapy, pancreatic cancer often does not respond to this type of treatment. One potential reason for this lack of efficacy is that pancreatic tumors tend to be nonimmunogenic, meaning that the cancer fails to elicit a strong immune response.

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