Srivani Ravoori, PhD

Srivani Ravoori, PhD, is associate director of science communications at the AACR. Ravoori is an experienced science content developer and an expert in translating complex cancer science into simple language with the goal of educating the public, media, policymakers, and the health care industry about the importance of cancer research. She guides the Communications and Public Relations department in identifying the latest cancer research advances and disseminate them through various print and social media platforms. She holds a PhD degree in cancer biology and dedicated the first 15 years of her career to conducting basic and translational cancer research.

Targets Conference Showcases Exciting Data from Clinical Trials of Innovative Cancer Therapeutics

There has been an explosion in the number of cancer therapeutics and clinical trials in the recent past, owing to our ability to better define the molecular targets of different cancers using cutting-edge technologies. Unlike in the past, data from early-stage clinical trials are getting more attention lately because the efficacy of a therapeutic, traditionally evaluated in later-phase trials, is often becoming evident earlier in the course of clinical testing.

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Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics Conference Moves Targeting KRAS to the Fore

After three decades of failed efforts to target the elusive KRAS and its family members NRAS and HRAS, proto-oncogenes altered in about a third of cancers, encouraging data emerging from clinical trials and preclinical studies suggest KRAS could finally be dethroned from the “undruggable” category.

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Ovarian Cancer: Examining the Microenvironment and Mutational Landscapes to Tailor Treatments

The AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held this year at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston Oct. 26-30, has once again brought together members of academia, pharmaceutical industry, federal regulatory agencies, and all other stakeholders in the cancer drug development space from across the globe to discuss the most up-to-date advances.

A couple of studies presented at the conference set out to address an important question in cancer research – why is ovarian cancer so hard to treat?

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Toward Achieving Health Equity – A Preview of the 12th AACR Cancer Health Disparities Conference

In recent decades, the cancer research community has made great strides by bringing new, targeted, safer, and longer-lasting treatments to patients dealing with a variety of cancers. While this achievement is truly remarkable and laudable, a glaring fact is that these groundbreaking advances have not translated into progress for everyone.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2019: Leaders Share Highlights and Future Direction

One of the world’s largest cancer research conferences, the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, came to an end with a plenary session titled “AACR Annual Meeting 2019 Highlights: Vision for the Future.” Leaders of the AACR provided an overview of the stellar presentations from the meeting on the topics of prevention, early detection, interception, and the latest breakthroughs in cutting-edge basic, translational, and clinical research.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2019: New Approaches to Treating Drug-resistant Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

About 80 percent of lung cancers are non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), and about 15 to 20 percent of NSCLCs harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-activating mutations.
Treatment for EGFR-mutant NSCLC improved dramatically with the introduction of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Several TKIs targeting this receptor have been developed, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved first-generation EGFR TKIs gefitinib (Iressa) and erlotinib (Tarceva); second-generation EGFR TKIs, such as the FDA-approved afatinib (Gilotrif) and dacomitinib (Vizimpro), and the investigational therapeutic neratinib; and third-generation EGFR TKIs, including the FDA-approved osimertinib (Tagrisso), and the investigational therapeutics olmutinib and nazartinib.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2019: Optimizing PD-1/PD-L1 Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy

Immune checkpoint inhibitors have become part of the standard of care for more than 14 different cancer types, including melanoma, lung cancer, head and neck cancer, bladder cancer, cervical cancer, liver cancer, stomach cancer, breast cancer, lymphoma, and to treat patients with any type of solid tumor that is microsatellite instability–high or mismatch repair–deficient. In a clinical trial plenary session held April 1 at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, titled “Optimizing PD-1/PD-L1 Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: Dedicated to the Memory of Waun Ki Hong,” cancer researchers updated attendees on the latest advances in the utility of this class of immunotherapeutics, either as monotherapy or in combination with other treatment modalities.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2019: Promising Data from CAR T-cell Clinical Trials for Advanced Solid Tumors

A pair of studies presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019 demonstrated encouraging clinical outcomes with two different chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies for patients with advanced solid tumors.

CAR T-cell therapy is a type of immunotherapy in which T cells are removed from a patient’s body and genetically modified so that they can recognize the patient’s cancer cells. The modified T cells, when reintroduced into the patient’s body, multiply and attack cancer cells. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved two CAR T-cell therapies for blood cancers so far: tisagenlecleucel (Kymriah) for treating certain patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and axicabtagene ciloleucel (Yescarta) for treating certain adults with NHL.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2019 Opening Plenary Session: Wearable Technologies, Precision Medicine, and Immunotherapy

The spectacular sight of the AACR Annual Meeting 2019 Opening Ceremony, held Sunday, March 31, at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta was immediately followed by a splendid opening plenary session, titled “Achieving Equitable Patient Care through Precision and Convergent Cancer Science.”

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