AACR Science Policy and Government Affairs Office

AACR Takes Action Against the “Epidemic” of Youth E-cigarette Use

In the past year, the number of American teenagers using tobacco products has increased by nearly 40 percent, reversing a trend that public health officials worked tirelessly to achieve.
The primary culprit in the resurgence of smoking? E-cigarettes. Taking aim at this growing public health problem, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) held a congressional briefing on Wednesday, June 12, titled “E-cigarettes and Nicotine Addiction: A Potential Health Crisis for Youth and Young Adults.” The roster of speakers included leaders from government, research, and policy sectors.

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Taking Aim at Tobacco: Highlights From Annual Meeting Symposium

The tobacco product landscape is evolving and the AACR Tobacco Products and Cancer Subcommittee has been cognizant of the shift from combusted products (e.g., cigarettes) to alternative nicotine delivery systems, such as e-cigarettes. While it is generally accepted that e-cigarettes are safer than traditional cigarettes, these products still present risks and the AACR has been active in trying to keep children from having access to them.

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NIH-AACR Conference Explores Intersection of Cancer, Autoimmunity, and Immunology

Although checkpoint inhibitors and other immunotherapies are remarkably effective for patients with some cancers, demonstrating durable antitumor activity and/or high response rates, they are not risk-free. Reports of immune-related adverse events (therapy-dependent toxicities caused by non-specific activation of the immune system) surfaced early in development for ipilimumab and accompany all approved immunotherapies.

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) will join the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases to convene the NIH-AACR Cancer, Autoimmunity, and Immunology Conference on April 15-16, 2019, in the Masur Auditorium on the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Maryland.

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Lending Their Voices to the Call for Cancer Research Funding

US Capitol Building

Each year, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) holds Early-career Hill Day, bringing a group of AACR Associate members to Washington, D.C., to advocate for strong funding for cancer research and biomedical science. Along with representatives of the AACR’s Science Policy and Government Affairs office, they meet with lawmakers or members of their staffs, urging them to vote for continued robust funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Cancer Institute.

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Translating Science Into Survival: An AACR Early-career Scientist Returns to the Hill

One late summer morning, I recall seeing a petite woman carrying two suitcases near the entrance to a hospital. She was alone and seemed indifferent to the commotion enveloping her.

This instance was mere moments long, yet it is ingrained in my memory. Because nearly six years ago, when I entered our cancer hospital on my first day as a doctoral student in cancer biology, this was exactly what I saw. I saw a woman, carrying her most precious belongings as she checked into the hospital for cancer treatment.

As I offered to help with her luggage, she kindly obliged and asked to share with me her story. Why? She wanted “at least one person to remember” her. And she got her wish, before succumbing to her disease two weeks later.

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Stakeholder Perspectives on Non-clinical Models for Immuno-Oncology Products

On September 6, 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Association for Cancer Research hosted a public workshop, Non-clinical Models for Safety Assessment of Immuno-Oncology Products. Academics, industry, regulators, and biomedical research funders gathered to review the state of the science and discuss opportunities to develop better non-clinical approaches for safety assessment and dose selection for immuno-oncology products in patients, with specific focus on immune checkpoint stimulators and inhibitors (ICS/ICI).

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Joint Workshop Leads to Recommendations on Novel Drug-Radiation Combinations

Radiotherapy is a mainstay of cancer treatment. In recent years, improved technology has allowed many cancer patients to receive more targeted doses of radiation, which can improve efficacy and spare …

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AACR Applauds FDA’s New Steps to Address Epidemic of Youth E-cigarette Use

In 2017, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) were the most commonly used tobacco product among high and middle school students. Many public health experts believe that youth use of e-cigarettes has reached an epidemic proportion.

On September 12, 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a series of critical and historic enforcement actions related to the sale and marketing of e-cigarettes to kids. This effort included issuing more than 1,300 warning letters and fines to retailers who illegally sold e-cigarette products to minors.

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FDA Workshop to Address Need for Non-clinical Models to Advance Immuno-oncology

Immuno-oncology has revolutionized treatment for certain types of cancers, but currently it is only effective for about 20 percent of cancer patients. To drive the development of safe and effective immunotherapies for all patients, we need strong science at every stage of drug development, particularly in combination therapy. To this end, refining existing non-clinical models or developing new ones to assess the safety of immuno-oncology products will require cross-sector collaboration among regulatory, industry, and academic experts. The upcoming FDA-AACR Non-clinical Models for Safety Assessment of Immuno-oncology Products Workshop will bring these stakeholders together to discuss this vital issue.

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AACR Holds Congressional Briefing on Strengthening Prevention of E-Cigarette Use in Youth

US Capitol Building

Policymakers, parents, teachers, and public health professionals have all expressed concern about the rise in teen vaping and a strong desire to find ways to reverse the trend. On Wednesday, the American Association for Cancer Research held a congressional briefing to update policymakers and the public on the latest scientific evidence related to e-cigarettes and to start a dialogue about challenges and potential solutions in prevention of youth vaping.

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