Understanding Inherited Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. In 2018, 266,120 women and 2,550 men are expected to receive the news that they have the disease, according to National Cancer Institute data.

Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes account for between 5 percent and 10 percent of breast cancers in U.S. women and between 5 percent and 20 percent of breast cancers in U.S. men. For women who undergo genetic testing and learn that they have inherited a BRCA1/2 mutation before they receive a breast cancer diagnosis there are ways to reduce their risk of going on to develop the disease.

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Can Artificial Intelligence Help Reduce False-positive Mammograms?

In a study published in the AACR’s journal Clinical Cancer Research, a team of scientists from the University of Pittsburgh discuss yet another area of cancer research where artificial intelligence (AI) can potentially solve a decades-long problem: false-positive results and high patient recall rates from breast cancer screening mammography.

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What is Convergence? How Can It Further Cancer Research?

The 30th Anniversary AACR Special Conference Convergence: Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, and Prediction in Cancer is focusing on a relatively new interdisciplinary field that seeks to further cancer research through the use of mathematics and computation, among other disciplines.

We had the opportunity to speak with both co-chairs about convergence and several areas of interest that will be discussed at the upcoming meeting, to be held Oct. 14-17 in Newport, Rhode Island.

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Foti Meets with Israeli President, Discusses Cancer’s Global Impact

On Sunday, Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), chief executive officer of the AACR, met with the president of Israel, Reuven Rivlin, at his residence in Jerusalem.

Foti has had a long, fruitful relationship with the Israeli cancer community. Her meeting with Rivlin and First Lady Nechama Rivlin was coordinated by longtime friend and colleague Miri Ziv, the Director General of the Israel Cancer Association.

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Three New Cancer Treatments Approved by the FDA

Last week saw a flurry of new anticancer therapeutics approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating several types of cancer. On Monday, Sept. 24, the agency approved the molecularly targeted therapeutic duvelisib (Copiktra) for treating certain patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), and for treating certain patients with follicular lymphoma. On Thursday, Sept. 27, it approved another molecularly targeted therapeutic—dacomitinib (Vizimpro)—for treating certain patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Then, on Friday, Sept. 28, it approved the immunotherapeutic cemiplimab-rwlc (Libtayo) for treating certain patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

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September Editors’ Picks from AACR Journals

As a monthly feature on this blog, we spotlight the 10 articles selected by our editors from each journal issue published by the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR). These journals feature original articles spanning the continuum of cancer research, from basic science discoveries to patient care.

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World Cancer Research Day: New Global Statistics Highlight the Need for Research

Today, September 24, 2018, is World Cancer Research Day. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is proud to join cancer organizations, associations, and researchers from around the world in supporting this global initiative that aims to raise awareness about the importance of cancer research for saving lives.

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