Bringing Awareness to Breast Cancer in October

Breast cancer can be a scary diagnosis. Even though mortality rates have declined in recent years in the United States, it is estimated that over 40,000 women and roughly 500 men will die from breast cancer in 2019. Despite progress in developing new treatment modalities for patients with this disease, there is still substantial work to be done in the field.

Read More

Frontiers in Cancer Science: the Singapore Cancer Conference

Providing a forum for innovative cancer researchers around the world, Singapore will hold its 11th Frontiers in Cancer Science (FCS) conference from November 4-6 at Academia at SingHealth.

The conference is jointly organized by the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, Duke-NUS Medical School, Genome Institute of Singapore, Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, National Cancer Centre Singapore, and National University Cancer Institute, Singapore.

Read More

Talking Tamales: A Culturally Tailored Health Education Strategy

The women bustle around a warm, colorful kitchen, making tamales for an upcoming family party. A woman in her 20s has received the distressing news that she has tested positive for the human papillomavirus (HPV). She’s upset and angry, but also resolved to do everything she can to prevent the virus from developing into cervical cancer.

Read More

AACR Grants Program Funds Diverse Range of Cancer Research

Since its inception in 1993, the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) Grants Program, in partnership with other nonprofit organizations, foundations, and pharmaceutical companies, has funded groundbreaking basic, translational, and clinical cancer research. In 2019 alone, the AACR awarded more than $12.5 million in grants to support innovative and impactful cancer research projects.

The AACR Grants Program supports researchers at all career levels by awarding fellowships, career development awards, independent investigator awards, team science awards, and its flagship NextGen Grants for Transformative Cancer Research.

Read More

Use of Pembrolizumab Expanded to 13th Type of Cancer in Five Years

The use of immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer has dramatically increased in the five years since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first approved the groundbreaking immunotherapeutic pembrolizumab (Keytruda). Since that September 2014 approval, for melanoma, pembrolizumab has been approved for use in the treatment of another 12 types of cancer, most recently endometrial cancer, and the treatment of any type of solid tumor that tests positive for either of two specific biomarkers, microsatellite instability–high or mismatch repair–deficient.

Read More

AACR Meeting Highlights Recent Advances in Pediatric Cancer Research

Pediatric cancer, while rare, is a devastating diagnosis that is estimated to affect over 11,000 children in the United States in 2019. Among those diagnosed between birth and age 14, more than 1,000 are anticipated to die from the disease this year. The most common types of cancer in this age group are leukemias, brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors, and lymphomas.

Read More

From the Journals: Editors’ Picks for September

As we welcome the fall season, it’s time for our September edition of Editors’ Picks, a monthly collection of articles hand-picked by the editors of the eight scientific journals published by the AACR. This month, articles span from an assessment of a first-in-class antibody-drug conjugate targeting the antigen CD205 in xenograft models, to results from a clinical trial evaluating the dual inhibition of VEGFR2 and MET in patients with advanced solid tumors. Read on to learn about this month’s selections, which are freely available for a limited time.

Read More

Learning Lessons From Diverse Populations

The 12th AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved wrapped up Monday in San Francisco. This year marked record attendance for the conference, as well as a record number of abstracts that helped shape a dynamic, diverse program.

The meeting reinforced the central dilemma of cancer health disparities: While advances in cancer research have improved outcomes for many Americans, underserved and underrepresented groups have not benefited equally.

Read More