Recent Advances in Measuring Response to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

In recent years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved immune checkpoint inhibitors, a class of immunotherapy, to treat 10 different types of cancer, in addition to solid tumors located anywhere in the body that have certain DNA damage and repair-related biomarkers. However, only a small percentage of patients respond to these treatments, and they can have significant side effects. Researchers are looking for biomarkers that can identify patients who are likely to respond to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

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FDA Approvals for Liver and Stomach Cancer Extend the Reach of Immunotherapy

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) increased the number of types of cancer for which immunotherapeutics known as checkpoint inhibitors are a treatment option when it expanded the approved uses of nivolumab (Opdivo) and pembrolizumab (Keytruda) to include certain patients with liver cancer and stomach cancer, respectively.

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Lessons Learned From Combining Anti-OX40 and Anti-PD1 Immunotherapies

A pair of studies published recently in journals of the American Association for Cancer Research bring to our attention the unexpected negative consequences of combining two immunotherapeutics concurrently, and discuss the mechanisms behind improved antitumor effects and survival outcomes with sequential administration of the two drugs.

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AACR Blog Turns 3: Check Out Our Top 10 Posts

Three years ago, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) launched this blog with a welcome post from Chief Executive Officer Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc). Since then, we’ve had the privilege of reporting on some significant progress against cancer, including the rise of immunotherapy and precision medicine.

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New Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Approved for Bladder Cancer

Earlier this week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it had approved a new immune checkpoint inhibitor, durvalumab (Imfinzi), for the treatment of certain patients with the most common form of bladder cancer—urothelial carcinoma.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2017: Most Merkel Cell Carcinoma Responses to the Newly FDA-Approved Avelumab Expected to Last More than a Year

T cells and antibodies

On March 23, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the first-ever approval of a treatment for patients with a rare, aggressive form of skin cancer called Merkel cell carcinoma. The treatment, the immunotherapeutic avelumab (Bavencio), was approved based on data from the JAVELIN Merkel 200 phase II clinical trial.

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