FDA Approves Targeted Therapy Combo for Thyroid Cancer

On May 4, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a combination of molecularly targeted therapeutics for the treatment of a certain type of thyroid cancer. Specifically, the FDA approved the use of dabrafenib (Tafinlar) in combination with trametinib (Mekinist) for treating patients who have anaplastic thyroid cancer that cannot be removed by surgery or that has metastasized, and that tests positive for a BRAF V600E gene mutation.

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Joint Workshop to Address Lack of Drug-Radiotherapy Combinations

The field of medical oncology is undergoing a remarkable transformation. Cancers that were once considered death sentences, such as multiple myeloma and metastatic melanoma, are turning into chronic diseases due to the use of novel, targeted systemic therapies. Immunotherapy is altering the natural history of certain malignancies.

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FDA Approves Targeted Radiotherapy for Neuroendocrine Tumors

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently added a new therapeutic to the armamentarium for oncologists treating patients with neuroendocrine tumors. The new therapeutic—lutetium (Lu) 177 dotatate (Lutathera)—is a targeted form of systemic radiotherapy.

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FDA Approves First Targeted Therapeutic for BRCA-mutant Breast Cancer

On Friday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the molecularly targeted therapeutic olaparib (Lynparza) for treating certain patients with metastatic, HER2-negative breast cancer. The FDA also granted marketing authorization for a test to identify those patients eligible to receive olaparib: patients with an inherited, cancer-associated BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation.

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Biosimilars: Breaking Through to Cancer Treatment

A little-talked-about provision of the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act designed to improve access to innovative medical therapies has recently borne fruit for the cancer community in the form of two new therapeutic options for a wide range of cancers—bevacizumab-awwb (Mvasi) and trastuzumab-dkst (Ogivri).

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