New Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Approved for Bladder Cancer

Earlier this week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it had approved a new immune checkpoint inhibitor, durvalumab (Imfinzi), for the treatment of certain patients with the most common form of bladder cancer—urothelial carcinoma.

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New Guidelines Suggest Individualized Approach to Prostate Cancer Screening

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released draft recommendations April 11 suggesting that doctors inform men ages 55 to 69 of the potential benefits and harms of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood testing to screen for prostate cancer. The draft says the decision to be screened is an individual one that should be made after consulting with a physician.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2017: The Patient Perspective

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2017 brought some of the world’s greatest scientific minds to Washington, D.C., to address research challenges in cancer. But significant findings also came from cancer patient advocates and survivors who attended the meeting.

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Congressman Advocates for Increased Funding for Cancer Research and Prevention

Last month, U.S. Rep. Donald Payne Jr. (D-New Jersey), led a roundtable discussion at University Hospital in Newark, New Jersey, titled “Cancer Research Today: Innovation, Progress and Promise.” Payne shared his family’s history as part of an effort to increase awareness about colorectal cancer screening.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2017: Challenging the Dogma of Treating IDH-mutant Cancers With IDH Inhibitors

Two studies presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2017 showed that tumors that have mutations in the proteins isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 or -2 (IDH1/2) exhibited features similar to that of BRCA-mutant tumors and are, therefore, more likely to respond better to PARP inhibitors than to IDH inhibitors.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2017: Most Merkel Cell Carcinoma Responses to the Newly FDA-Approved Avelumab Expected to Last More than a Year

T cells and antibodies

On March 23, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the first-ever approval of a treatment for patients with a rare, aggressive form of skin cancer called Merkel cell carcinoma. The treatment, the immunotherapeutic avelumab (Bavencio), was approved based on data from the JAVELIN Merkel 200 phase II clinical trial.

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