Treating DNA Repair-deficient Breast Cancers

Several clinical trials are underway in which PARP inhibitors are being tested in breast cancers, mostly triple-negative breast cancers, because they often harbor BRCA mutations and DNA repair deficiencies. Emerging studies show that the benefit of PARP inhibitors could extend beyond breast cancers with germline BRCA mutations.

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NextGen Grant Recipient Harnesses the Power of Genomics to Understand Pediatric Brain Cancer

Paul Northcott, PhD, inaugural recipient of the AACR NextGen Grant for Transformative Cancer Research, has dedicated his research career to understanding a type of brain cancer called medulloblastoma, with the ultimate goal of improving treatment and prognosis for patients.

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Recent Advances in Measuring Response to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

In recent years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved immune checkpoint inhibitors, a class of immunotherapy, to treat 10 different types of cancer, in addition to solid tumors located anywhere in the body that have certain DNA damage and repair-related biomarkers. However, only a small percentage of patients respond to these treatments, and they can have significant side effects. Researchers are looking for biomarkers that can identify patients who are likely to respond to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

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Q&A with Anil K. Sood, MD, on Ovarian Cancer Research and Treatment

On Sunday, almost 300 of the greatest minds in ovarian cancer research will come together in Pittsburgh to discuss the latest advances in the field at the American Association for Cancer Research four-day conference on Addressing Critical Questions in Ovarian Cancer Research and Treatment.

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AACR Cancer Progress Report 2017: Harnessing Research Discoveries to Save Lives

Today, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) released its seventh annual Cancer Progress Report. The report highlights how federally funded research that provides a deep understanding of the biology of cancer is spurring advances across the clinical cancer care continuum that are improving survival and quality of life for people around the world.

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Lessons Learned From Combining Anti-OX40 and Anti-PD1 Immunotherapies

A pair of studies published recently in journals of the American Association for Cancer Research bring to our attention the unexpected negative consequences of combining two immunotherapeutics concurrently, and discuss the mechanisms behind improved antitumor effects and survival outcomes with sequential administration of the two drugs.

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