Treating DNA Repair-deficient Breast Cancers

Several clinical trials are underway in which PARP inhibitors are being tested in breast cancers, mostly triple-negative breast cancers, because they often harbor BRCA mutations and DNA repair deficiencies. Emerging studies show that the benefit of PARP inhibitors could extend beyond breast cancers with germline BRCA mutations.

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Recent Advances in Measuring Response to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

In recent years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved immune checkpoint inhibitors, a class of immunotherapy, to treat 10 different types of cancer, in addition to solid tumors located anywhere in the body that have certain DNA damage and repair-related biomarkers. However, only a small percentage of patients respond to these treatments, and they can have significant side effects. Researchers are looking for biomarkers that can identify patients who are likely to respond to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

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Lessons Learned From Combining Anti-OX40 and Anti-PD1 Immunotherapies

A pair of studies published recently in journals of the American Association for Cancer Research bring to our attention the unexpected negative consequences of combining two immunotherapeutics concurrently, and discuss the mechanisms behind improved antitumor effects and survival outcomes with sequential administration of the two drugs.

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News from the Cancer Centers: How DCIS Becomes Invasive Breast Cancer

Earlier this year, a study published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), explored the question of how preinvasive breast tumors become invasive. The study’s lead author, Kornelia Polyak, MD, PhD, discussed the findings in an article published by Inside the Institute, a publication of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

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The Fuzzy Factor: Striving to Protect Patient Privacy in Big Data Sets

A major objective of former Vice President Joe Biden’s National Cancer Moonshot Initiative is breaking down silos and sharing cancer patients’ data across centers. This path is critical to bringing new dimensions to understanding the molecular biology of cancer, leading to the rapid identification of new therapeutic targets and accelerated development of molecularly informed cancer therapeutics.

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What Advances are Researchers Making in Treating Glioblastoma, McCain’s Cancer?

As we learned recently, Senator John McCain was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme, an aggressive form of central nervous system tumor that starts in the brain or spinal cord. It accounts for about 45 percent of all primary brain tumors, with about 11,000 diagnoses in men, women, and children each year.

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Charting the Future of Cancer Health Disparities Research

Yesterday, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) joined the American Cancer Society (ACS), the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in releasing a joint position statement to guide the future of cancer health disparities research.

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A Targeted Therapy Next in Line for Biomarker-based Cancer Drug Approval?

recent data suggest that there is another potential contender for a biomarker-based FDA approval: a targeted therapeutic called larotrectinib (LOXO-101), which showed promising results in adults and children with a variety of cancer types, all of which had one thing in common – fusions involving the gene TRK.

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Catching Childhood Cancers Early: Insights Into the AACR Childhood Cancer Predisposition Workshop

There is perhaps nothing more painful for parents than receiving a cancer diagnosis for their child. Childhood cancers are generally rare, and in the United States, the death rates have …

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Heading Into Summer, Please “Don’t Fry”

Today is National “Don’t Fry Day,” an initiative undertaken by the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention to encourage sun safety awareness and to remind people to limit their exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which has been proven to cause skin cancer.

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