Srivani Ravoori, PhD

Srivani Ravoori, PhD, is associate director of science communications at the AACR. Ravoori helps manage science content creation for the Communications and Public Relations Department and guides the team in identifying the latest advances in cancer research from the organization's conferences, journals, and other scientific activities. Ravoori helps develop strategies to integrate and streamline the dissemination of cancer science through various communications and social media platforms. Ravoori is an experienced science content developer and an expert in translating complex cancer science into simple language with the goal of educating the public, media, policymakers, and the health care industry about the importance of cancer research. She holds a PhD degree in cancer biology and dedicated the first 15 years of her career to conducting basic and translational cancer research.

The Fuzzy Factor: Striving to Protect Patient Privacy in Big Data Sets

A major objective of former Vice President Joe Biden’s National Cancer Moonshot Initiative is breaking down silos and sharing cancer patients’ data across centers. This path is critical to bringing new dimensions to understanding the molecular biology of cancer, leading to the rapid identification of new therapeutic targets and accelerated development of molecularly informed cancer therapeutics.

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What Advances are Researchers Making in Treating Glioblastoma, McCain’s Cancer?

As we learned recently, Senator John McCain was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme, an aggressive form of central nervous system tumor that starts in the brain or spinal cord. It accounts for about 45 percent of all primary brain tumors, with about 11,000 diagnoses in men, women, and children each year.

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A Targeted Therapy Next in Line for Biomarker-based Cancer Drug Approval?

recent data suggest that there is another potential contender for a biomarker-based FDA approval: a targeted therapeutic called larotrectinib (LOXO-101), which showed promising results in adults and children with a variety of cancer types, all of which had one thing in common – fusions involving the gene TRK.

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Catching Childhood Cancers Early: Insights Into the AACR Childhood Cancer Predisposition Workshop

There is perhaps nothing more painful for parents than receiving a cancer diagnosis for their child. Childhood cancers are generally rare, and in the United States, the death rates have …

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Advancing Translational Cancer Medicine in Latin America

In recent years, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) has expanded its efforts to catalyze advances in cancer research globally and support its members residing in 107 countries in addition to the United States. One important initiative this year was the landmark conference held May 4-6, in São Paulo, Brazil—the AACR International Conference on Translational Cancer Medicine.

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Do Genomic Approaches to Selecting Cancer Treatment Yield Better Patient Outcomes Than Traditional Approaches?

A study published recently in the AACR’s journal Cancer Discovery addresses the burgeoning question of the utility of high-throughput genomic analysis in identifying targeted therapies and delivering better outcomes for cancer patients, and adds important evidence to argue in favor of such an approach. The jury, nevertheless, is still out.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2017: Challenging the Dogma of Treating IDH-mutant Cancers With IDH Inhibitors

Two studies presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2017 showed that tumors that have mutations in the proteins isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 or -2 (IDH1/2) exhibited features similar to that of BRCA-mutant tumors and are, therefore, more likely to respond better to PARP inhibitors than to IDH inhibitors.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2017: If You Can’t Drug It, Degrade It – A Protein Degradation Technology to Tackle Undruggable Oncoproteins

Finding a way to therapeutically target the so-called “undruggable” cancer proteins has long been a holy grail of researchers in the field of oncology drug development.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2017: Immunotherapy Provides Long-lasting Responses to Certain Cancer Types

Now that a plethora of clinical trials have established positive responses from immunotherapies—immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular—in patients with a variety of cancer types, one of the logical next questions is, are the responses durable?

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