Marci Landsmann

Marci Landsmann is the editor of Cancer Today magazine, which is published by the AACR as a practical resource for anyone affected by a cancer, whether a patient, caregiver, or survivor. She has been a medical editor and writer for more than 15 years. Before joining the AACR, Landsmann was the editor of a Healthy Aging, a magazine for physicians. Landsmann lives outside of Philadelphia.

Honoring the Life of an Advocate

In the fall issue, Cancer Today had the honor of highlighting two women whose cancer diagnoses led them to form a powerful partnership. AnneMarie Ciccarella and Lori Marx-Rubiner met each other after attending a weekly Twitter chat under the social media hashtag #BCSM (for Breast Cancer Social Media). They formed an unbreakable bond that challenged them both—and ultimately affected many researchers.

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Understanding Premalignancy and Cancer Risk

Prevention is often said to be more powerful than a cure. With an eye toward thwarting the disease, some researchers are trying to understand the molecular processes that are present in cells before cancer develops. These efforts, which analyze the potential power of premalignancy, are featured in the spring issue of Cancer Today.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2017: The Patient Perspective

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2017 brought some of the world’s greatest scientific minds to Washington, D.C., to address research challenges in cancer. But significant findings also came from cancer patient advocates and survivors who attended the meeting.

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Cancer in the Crescent City: The AACR Hosts a Community Event to Talk About Cancer in Louisiana

Many things come to mind at the mention of New Orleans—jazz, Cajun food, po’ boys, and French-inspired houses with ornate wrought-iron railings. But the Crescent City is located in Louisiana, …

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With Push to Advance Cancer Research, Technology Plays Vital Role in Vice President Biden’s Cancer Initiative

Whether cures for cancer are realized through personalized medicine, cancer vaccines, immunotherapy, or a combination of these or other developments, the panelists in Davos confirmed that the technology that allows researchers to collaborate will play a leading role.

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