Karen Honey, PhD

As senior managing editor, science communications, Karen Honey, PhD, helps the AACR communicate scientific information to the public and educate the public about the importance of lifesaving cancer research. Before joining the AACR, Honey spent eight years working as an editor for two peer-reviewed scientific journals, first Nature Reviews Immunology and then The Journal of Clinical Investigation. During this time, she focused on communicating scientific discoveries to readers with all levels of knowledge, from the lay reader to the scientific expert. Before entering the world of science communication, Honey was a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of world-renowned immunologist Alexander Rudensky. She was born in the United Kingdom and received her doctorate in transplantation immunology from the University of Oxford. Honey currently lives in the Philadelphia suburbs.

Vemurafenib Becomes First FDA-approved Treatment for a Rare Type of Blood Cancer

Recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the molecularly targeted therapeutic vemurafenib (Zelboraf) for treating certain adults who have a rare type of blood cancer called Erdheim-Chester disease. Vemurafenib targets mutant forms of the protein BRAF, and it has been approved for treating those patients whose Erdheim-Chester disease harbors the BRAF V600 mutation.

Read More

How Does Lung Cancer Evade the Immune System?

Much has been written, including on this blog, about the rapidly expanding use of immunotherapy to treat an increasing array of cancer types, including lung cancer. The development of these new treatments, which harness a patient’s immune system to fight cancer, is built upon many years of basic research in the fields of immunology and cancer biology.

Read More

Advances in Tobacco Control

Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of death from lung cancer in the United States. That’s why November, Lung Cancer Awareness Month, is a good time to highlight new advances in tobacco control, such as the legislation that came into effect Nov. 1, 2017, in New Jersey that raises the minimum age of legal access to tobacco products to 21.

Read More

FDA Approves New Treatment Option for Breast Cancer

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provided some good news for the breast cancer community just days before the start of breast cancer awareness month when it added a new molecularly targeted therapeutic to the armamentarium for oncologists treating patients with breast cancer: abemaciclib (Verzenio).

Read More

Q&A with Anil K. Sood, MD, on Ovarian Cancer Research and Treatment

On Sunday, almost 300 of the greatest minds in ovarian cancer research will come together in Pittsburgh to discuss the latest advances in the field at the American Association for Cancer Research four-day conference on Addressing Critical Questions in Ovarian Cancer Research and Treatment.

Read More

FDA Approvals for Liver and Stomach Cancer Extend the Reach of Immunotherapy

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) increased the number of types of cancer for which immunotherapeutics known as checkpoint inhibitors are a treatment option when it expanded the approved uses of nivolumab (Opdivo) and pembrolizumab (Keytruda) to include certain patients with liver cancer and stomach cancer, respectively.

Read More

FDA Approves New Molecularly Targeted Therapeutic for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

The flurry of treatments approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating hematological malignancies continued last week with the approval of the molecularly targeted therapeutic copanlisib (Aliqopa) for the treatment of certain adults with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Read More