Karen Honey, PhD

As senior managing editor, science communications, Karen Honey, PhD, helps the AACR communicate scientific information to the public and educate the public about the importance of lifesaving cancer research. Before joining the AACR, Honey spent eight years working as an editor for two peer-reviewed scientific journals, first Nature Reviews Immunology and then The Journal of Clinical Investigation. During this time, she focused on communicating scientific discoveries to readers with all levels of knowledge, from the lay reader to the scientific expert. Before entering the world of science communication, Honey was a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of world-renowned immunologist Alexander Rudensky. She was born in the United Kingdom and received her doctorate in transplantation immunology from the University of Oxford. Honey currently lives in the Philadelphia suburbs.

FDA Approves New Molecularly Targeted Therapeutic for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

The flurry of treatments approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating hematological malignancies continued last week with the approval of the molecularly targeted therapeutic copanlisib (Aliqopa) for the treatment of certain adults with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

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AACR Cancer Progress Report 2017: Harnessing Research Discoveries to Save Lives

Today, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) released its seventh annual Cancer Progress Report. The report highlights how federally funded research that provides a deep understanding of the biology of cancer is spurring advances across the clinical cancer care continuum that are improving survival and quality of life for people around the world.

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New Treatment for Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Approved by the FDA

This week’s excitement surrounding the groundbreaking U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the CAR T–cell therapy tisagenlecleucel (Kymriah) for treating certain pediatric and young adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was not the only good news for ALL community in August. Earlier in the month, the FDA approved a new molecularly targeted therapeutic called inotuzumab ozogamicin (Besponsa) for treating adults who have B-cell precursor ALL that did not respond to initial treatment or that returned after treatment.

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FDA Approves Two New Treatments for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

This week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) added two new treatments to the armamentarium for hematologic oncologists treating certain groups of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): enasidenib (Idhifa) and Vyxeos. This news is particularly welcome because AML is the form of leukemia with the lowest five-year relative survival rate.

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FDA Approves a New HER2-targeted Therapeutic for Breast Cancer

Earlier this week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new molecularly targeted therapeutic called neratinib (Nerlynx) for treating certain patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Specifically, the FDA approved neratinib for reducing disease recurrence in patients with early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer who have completed postsurgery (adjuvant) treatment with trastuzumab (Herceptin) and whose disease has not progressed.

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FDA Approves New Lung Cancer Treatment and First Next-Gen Companion Diagnostic

Hot on the heels of the FDA’s landmark approval of an anticancer therapeutic for use based on whether a patient has a tumor with certain biomarkers, rather than a tumor originating at a certain anatomic site, the agency approved the first companion diagnostic that can detect mutations in multiple genes in a single test.

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FDA Approves First Use for an Anticancer Therapeutic Based on Tumor Biomarker, Not Tumor Origin

Tuesday marked a milestone for the oncology community: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced its first approval of an anticancer therapeutic for use based on whether a patient has a tumor with certain biomarkers and not where in the body the tumor originated.

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FDA Approves Fourth Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor for Bladder Cancer

This time last year there were no immune checkpoint inhibitors approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating the most common form of bladder cancer—urothelial carcinoma. The approval of avelumab (Bavencio) earlier this week means there are now four of these revolutionary immunotherapeutics in the armamentarium.

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