Karen Olsen, PhD

Karen Olsen, PhD, is a science writer at the AACR, where she facilitates the communication of the latest cancer research to the general public and to the trade press. Before joining the AACR, Olsen completed her postdoctoral training at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, where she investigated the role that epigenetic regulators play in cancers and neuronal disorders. She received her doctorate in chemistry from Purdue University, where she focused on integral membrane proteins associated with disease. Olsen lives in Center City Philadelphia.

Q&A With Ari M. Melnick, MD, on Recent Advances in Lymphoma

Lymphomas are a collection of blood cancers stemming from aberrant lymphocytes, which are critical components of the immune system. Lymphomas are classically divided into two categories – Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). It is estimated that over 90 percent of lymphomas are NHL, of which there are many distinct subtypes. Recent statistics estimate that nearly 75,000 new cases of NHL will be diagnosed in 2018.

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Utilizing Patient-reported Outcomes in Cancer Clinical Trials

Assessing new anticancer therapeutics in clinical trials is a vital step in evaluating the toxicity and efficacy of treatment before its approval for widespread use. Throughout these trials, many patients encounter a variety of side effects, ranging from physical ailments such as nausea or rash to psychological symptoms such as depression or anxiety. While it is standard practice to record clinician-reported outcomes to characterize safety, there is no current standard requirement for the use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in cancer clinical trials.

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AACR Annual Meeting 2018: Novel Immunotherapy Combinations to Combat Resistance to Checkpoint Inhibition

An exciting area in drug development, immunotherapy is being increasingly utilized by patients with different cancer types. These treatments work by stimulating the patient’s immune system to effectively target and …

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AACR Team Science Awardees Devise a Method to Detect Common Cancers Early

Early detection of cancer is arguably a holy grail in the field of cancer research. Catching the disease at an early stage could ultimately prevent thousands of deaths from late-diagnosed disease, which is more challenging to treat. Early detection tests exist for a handful of individual cancers, but no approved method can simultaneously screen for multiple types of cancer.

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How is Obesity Linked to Cancer?

Medical risks of obesity include high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Additionally, obesity has been associated with increased cancer incidence and mortality. To address the link between obesity and cancer, the American Association of Cancer Research is hosting a Special Conference, Obesity and Cancer: Mechanisms Underlying Etiology and Outcomes, this week in Austin, Texas.

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